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Locally Sourced Science

LSS 106: The story of the new Cornell CALS Dean and what is new in Alzheimer’s research

In this episode, Mark Sarvary interviewed the new dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Dr. Benjamin Houlton began his term on October 1, 2020, as the Ronald P. Lynch Dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. He is also and a professor in the departments of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Global Development.

Hear the story of how Dean Houlton almost received a Cornell Ph.D. and how he works with farmers in both California and in New York state to mitigate the impact of climate change.

In the second interview, Candice Limper talked to Nancy Ruiz about her research at Cornell University, discussing what Alzheimer’s disease is and some of the symptoms. Nancy is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate and is trying to understand what factors contribute to the development of this disease as part of her thesis. During this interview, she describes a mouse model that she uses to understand the molecular mechanisms involved.

In our Locally Birding segment, Kitty Gifford talked about the largest American woodpecker (and used some puns). Kitty mentioned in her segment this recent research: The Re-Establishment of Pileated Woodpeckers in New York City Following Nearly Two Centuries of Extirpation

pileated woodpecker in newfield new york
Pileated woodpecker in Newfield, NY | Photo by Kitty Gifford.

Thanks for listening and thanks to our contributors:

Producer: Mark Sarvary

Segments: Mark Sarvary, Candice Limper, Kitty Gifford

Music: Joe Lewis

LSS 105: Science Education in Colleges and Universities – Remote learning and camera use study; and a new course “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in STEM”

Kitty Gifford interviews Dr. Frank Castelli, Educational research postdoc with the Investigative Biology Teaching Laboratories at Cornell.

WordCloud using the text from recently published paper about why highered students don't turn on their cameras during Zoom classes. Provided by Frank Castelli
Word cloud created by Frank Castelli using student responses.

One of the greatest challenges in online learning is that students do not turn their cameras on and teachers speak into the void. Frank Castelli and his co-author, Mark Sarvary, studied this phenomenon and published a study in the Journal Ecology and Evolution titled  “Why Students Do Not Turn on Their Video Cameras During Online Classes and an Equitable and Inclusive Plan to Encourage Them to Do So,”

The results of the study are discussed along with a plan any instructor can use to encourage camera use:

1. Do NOT require video cameras to be turned on and do offer alternatives.

2. Explicitly encourage camera use, explain why you are doing so, and establish the norm

3. Address potential distractions and give breaks to help maintain attention.

4. Use active learning techniques to keep students engaged and promote equity.

5. Survey your students to understand their challenges.

You can also read about the study in the Cornell Chronicle:

Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras


Janani Hariharan interviews Dr. Corrie Moreau, Martha N. and John C. Moser Professor of Arthropod Biosystematics and Biodiversity at Cornell University.

Dr. Corrie Moreau

Dr. Moreau created a seminar class called Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in STEM in Fall 2020. This interview touches on her motivation to create such a class especially in the wake of the George Floyd protests of 2020, the structure of the class and her favorite moments of the class. She also shared some recommendations for other educators who might want to design similar classes at their own institutions.


Image of Mars NASA Rover Perseverance (Courtesy of SPIF)

And, to close out the show, Esther Racoosin speaks with Zoe Learner Ponterio, Manager at the Spacecraft Planetary Image Facility, also known as SPIF, located at Cornell. SPIF is hosting a watch party on Thursday, February 18 at 2:30 pm to view the landing of the Mars 2020 mission. To find out more about SPIF, visit http://www.cornellspif.com

LSS 104: Frog diseases, one health, pandemics, invasive species

Esther Racoosin speaks with Dr. Kelly Zamudio, Professor in the Cornell Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

Type of frog affected by a pathogenic fungus
A frog species that has been affected by the emergent pathogenic chytrid fungus.

Dr. Zamudio studies how emergent pathogenic chytrid (KIT-rid) fungi species are affecting amphibian populations in the Americas.

During the interview, Zamudio talks about how the principle of One Health is essential for both guiding the preservation of amphibian biodiversity around the world, as well as protecting human health.

Candice Limper speaks with Dr. Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann who is who is a New York State Integrated Pest Management program official.

Spotted lanternfly
Spotted lanternfly. Photo credit: Ryan Parker / NYSIPM

Gangloff-Kaufmann talks about a new bug in town called the spotted lanternfly, which is an invasive plant hopper that is native to China and likely arrived in North America hidden on goods imported from Asia. While this is a beautiful bug with all its spots and colors, it is posing a problem for some businesspeople in the local area. The reason for this is because it is eating plants such as those in the vineyards and orchards, which is not so great for business. 

LSS 103: How water can affect our lives

Happy 2021! In this episode we discuss the most essential element on this planet: water.

But first, Kitty Gifford will start with her new segment: “Locally birding! From the birdfeeder to the skies. Look out and look up!” She talks about the gyrfalcon.

Gyrfalcon (source: Wikipedia)

We decided to have two different approaches. First, Aiden Mahoney interviewed Helen Cheng about living on the coast and thinking about climate change related events, such as Hurricane Sandy.

Hurricane Sandy (source: Wikipedia)

Water resources are often affected by agricultural run-off. Eric Bates takes us to a modern dairy farm to discuss what farmers are doing in the Finger Lakes to help the Cayuga Lake Watershed.

Producer: Mark Sarvary

Music: joelewisbass.com

Interviewers: Aiden Mahoney and Eric Bates

Locally birding segment: Kitty Gifford