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Posts tagged as “STEM”

LSS 105: Science Education in Colleges and Universities – Remote learning and camera use study; and a new course “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in STEM”

Kitty Gifford interviews Dr. Frank Castelli, Educational research postdoc with the Investigative Biology Teaching Laboratories at Cornell.

WordCloud using the text from recently published paper about why highered students don't turn on their cameras during Zoom classes. Provided by Frank Castelli
Word cloud created by Frank Castelli using student responses.

One of the greatest challenges in online learning is that students do not turn their cameras on and teachers speak into the void. Frank Castelli and his co-author, Mark Sarvary, studied this phenomenon and published a study in the Journal Ecology and Evolution titled  “Why Students Do Not Turn on Their Video Cameras During Online Classes and an Equitable and Inclusive Plan to Encourage Them to Do So,”

The results of the study are discussed along with a plan any instructor can use to encourage camera use:

1. Do NOT require video cameras to be turned on and do offer alternatives.

2. Explicitly encourage camera use, explain why you are doing so, and establish the norm

3. Address potential distractions and give breaks to help maintain attention.

4. Use active learning techniques to keep students engaged and promote equity.

5. Survey your students to understand their challenges.

You can also read about the study in the Cornell Chronicle:

Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras


Janani Hariharan interviews Dr. Corrie Moreau, Martha N. and John C. Moser Professor of Arthropod Biosystematics and Biodiversity at Cornell University.

Dr. Corrie Moreau

Dr. Moreau created a seminar class called Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in STEM in Fall 2020. This interview touches on her motivation to create such a class especially in the wake of the George Floyd protests of 2020, the structure of the class and her favorite moments of the class. She also shared some recommendations for other educators who might want to design similar classes at their own institutions.

LSS 96: Juno Reveals Lightning Flashes in Jupiter’s Atmosphere; Third Grade Students Build Engineering Projects

Photo courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt.jpg

In today’s episode, we feature an interview about research on Jupiter’s atmosphere. 

Candice Limper speaks with Yury Aglyamov, a graduate student in the Cornell Department of Astronomy. He discusses his analysis of data from the NASA Juno spacecraft that reveal lightning flashes in the atmosphere of the planet Jupiter. Aglyamov is an author on a paper recently published in Nature, “Small Lightning Flashes From Shallow Electrical Storms on Jupiter”. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2532-1

Depiction of a simple bridge design and build engineering project (photo courtesy of “DSC06025” by Barrett.Discovery is licensed with Creative Commons BY 2.0)
Spencer Hill, 3rd Grade Teacher at Cayuga Heights Elementary School in Ithaca, NY (photo courtesy of S. Hill)

Later in the show, Esther Racoosin speaks with Spencer Hill. He is a 3rd grade teacher at Cayuga Heights Elementary in the Ithaca City School District.

After schools closed in mid-March of this year due to COVID-19, Hill and his colleagues, Kim Snow and Emily Graber, decided to continue to instruct their students to practice simple design and build projects.

Hill applied for a Red and Gold grant from the Ithaca Public Education Initiative to provide funding for the supplies for the projects. In this episode, he speaks about what it was like to instruct the kids to do these projects at home with their families instead of with their peers at school. To learn more about the Ithaca Public Education Initiatives, and their teacher grants, go to https://www.ipei.org/

Producer: Esther Racoosin

Interview of Yuri Aglyamov: Candice Limper

Music: Joe Lewis; Blue Dot Sessions